Center Project Reports

Hail to the Thief: Linguistic Agency Increases the Power of Consumer Education Materials about Identity Theft

Author(s): Matthew S. McGlone, Joseph McGlynn, III, Maxim V Baryshevstev, Kathleen G Blackburn, Max Aaron Wartel, Alexandra Abbott
Published on Aug 8, 2016
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Dramatic increases in the incidence and severity of identity theft have prompted many observers to characterize the problem as an “epidemic.” Combating the threat will require a multimodal intervention of new technologies, innovative business practices, a strengthened legislative framework, more engagement from law enforcement, and expanded victim assistance. It will also require comprehensive consumer education about the nature of the crime and measures people can take to reduce their vulnerability to it. In this respect, intervention efforts might benefit from the lessons learned in education campaigns about actual epidemiological threats such as influenza or HIV/AIDS.

The "Identity Literacy" Scale: A Preliminary Report

Author(s): Matthew S. McGlone, Dawna I. Ballard, Brenda L. Berkelaar, Maxim V Baryshevstev, Laura Brown
Published on Aug 8, 2016
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Identity theft has become the defining crime of the information age, with an estimated 13 million or more incidents each year in the U.S. alone (Finklea, 2014). Publicity generated by news coverage of severe cases of identity theft as well as various information campaigns in the public and private sector have raised consumer awareness about pernicious crime (Greis, Nogueira, & Kellogg, 2012). Arguably, however, relatively few consumers are aware of different identity theft varieties, which can range from minor swindles to major heists and are perpetrated by a broad spectrum of offenders, from family members to shadowy, international gangs.

Convenience vs. Security for Mobile Wallet Use

Author(s): Dawna I. Ballard, Matthew S. McGlone, Brenda L. Berkelaar, Maxim V Baryshevstev, Laura Brown
Published on Aug 8, 2016
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Industry professionals and scholars recognize that consumers make privacy decisions, such as the desirability of mobile wallet use, through weighing a variety of competing material and social factors. One of the classic reflections of this tension is the frequently cited “convenience-security” factor (Kim & Park, 2012). While the meaning of security is well-defined—if how to achieve it is an ever-changing issue and open to hot debate—there have been almost no attempts to define convenience. Various types of service convenience have been identified in marketing related to buying or using a service (Berry, Seiders, & Grewal, 2002), but this is domain specific and focuses on different types of service convenience without defining its fundamental attributes. This absence poses problems for an entire literature and industry that references an issue as if there is any understanding about what we mean.

Facial Recognition and Perceptions of Identity After Surgery

Author(s): Mia Markey
Published on Sep 1, 2015
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While this extensive data set affords many opportunities for continued analysis, this report highlights a few preliminary findings of particular interest: patterns in the observers’ emotional responses to facial disfigurement as a function of time since the patient underwent surgery; patterns in the observers’ emotional responses to facial disfigurement as a function of the location of the disfigurement (midface vs. peripheral); demonstration that our disfigurement model is able to simulate disfigurements in a way that evokes consistent emotional responses; and correlation between the proposed quantitative measure of retention of facial identity and observers’ subjective assessment of retention of facial identity. 

Enhancing Physical Device Identity Technology Through Physical Unclonable Functions

Author(s): Michael Orshansky
Published on Sep 1, 2015
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There exists a strong need for security, unique identification, and authentication of many of today’s electronic systems. It has been widely recognized that relying on the intrinsic properties of integrated circuits (ICs) that cannot be reproduced, or cloned, at will is attractive as it promises to create a unique and secure chip identity that is more resistant to malicious manipulation than other known techniques. Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) serve the role of such intrinsic chip identifiers

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